#DePaul in the NEWS

April 18, 2017
Chicago Tribune

Business economist John Berdell provides insight into President Donald Trump's "Buy American, Hire American" plan. "Economically, the big problem is how much more are you willing to pay? There's always tension between the push for low costs and trying to fight (unfair trade practices) long term," Berdell tells the Chicago Tribune

April 14, 2017
Next City

"Most gentrifiers give no attention to, or are unaware of, the history of housing injustices that made their neighborhood's real estate 'affordable,'" writes urban sociologist John Joe Schlictman in Next City. He profiles different types of misguided "gentrifiers against gentrification" and urges young people to "intelligently and respectfully participate in their communities."

April 13, 2017
The Atlantic

Big data has "worked against low-income students" in the college search process, reports The Atlantic. Enrollment expert David Kalsbeek and his co-author Donald R. Hossler at Indiana University are cited in the article: "'(Colleges) want it all,' Hossler and Kalsbeek wrote -- high-achieving students, low-income students, underrepresented minority students, and students from new geographic regions."

April 12, 2017
DNAinfo Chicago

The story of the Ward family and their connection to the Lincoln Park neighborhood, the university and St. Vincent de Paul Parish comes to life in a World War I exhibit at DePaul's Richardson Library. "The exhibit is and isn't about the war," says co-curator Andrea Bainbridge in DNA Info. "I'd say it's as much about the development of the university at that time, the things that shape it and make it." WGN Radio has more.

April 11, 2017
Home Health Care News

Home health professionals who spend a little extra time building relationships with patients may help shorten recovery times. "I know some of the pushback about being more engaging with patients is because it will take more time, but my response is that if it's done well, it's not going to be that much more time down the road," says Andrew Gallan, who researches patient experience in health care, in Home Health Care News.

April 11, 2017
Chicago Lawyer

"The rules of evidence are the lawyer's power tools," says Stephan Landsman, professor emeritus in the DePaul University College of Law. Many law students are no longer required to take an evidence course, and they are missing out, writes attorney and DePaul alumnus Bob Clifford in Chicago Lawyer

April 10, 2017
Crain's Chicago Business

United Airlines faced a "classic no-win situation" when a passenger refused to leave his seat, transportation expert Joseph Schwieterman tells the Chicago Tribune. "The incident highlights the tension that can arise when airlines break bad news to passengers," he adds in the Daily Herald

To win back public support, United CEO Oscar Munoz "needs to be out front," says public relations expert Ron Culp. "He'll probably have to become more visible. United will have to show it's contrite and admit to the fact that this was an overreaction," Culp tells Crain's Chicago Business.

April 10, 2017
The Miami Herald

DePaul alumnus Ali Rizvi is part of a team of journalists from 80 countries whose work on the "Panama Papers" project earned a Pulitzer Prize for explanatory reporting. The Miami Herald reports that Rizvi, who has a master's degree in digital cinema from DePaul's School of Cinematic Arts, co-produced a motion graphic video that illustrates the complex world of offshore banks and corporations.

April 10, 2017
WTTW

"At its core, chronic disease prevention and control is about helping people live longer, healthier lives," says Kate McMahon, an alumna of DePaul University's Master of Public Health program. "Public health can be especially impactful when we change policy, systems and the environment to improve health," she notes. WTTW reports that McMahon will lead Chicago's new Office of Chronic Disease Prevention and Control. 

April 07, 2017
WGN

The U.S. bombing of a Syrian military airbase shouldn't be a sign of things to come, says terrorism expert Tom Mockaitis on WGN's "Midday News." "(Syrian president) Bashar al-Assad was winning this war and will continue to do so," Mockaitis says. "I don't see the U.S. taking any more dramatic action except to get him to stop using chemical weapons."