#DePaul in the NEWS

June 19, 2017
WTTW

For people who are deaf, understanding another person is "not so much a lack of sound, but a language barrier," explains Rosalee Wolfe, a professor of human-computer animation. She and a team of researchers work on an avatar named Paula to automatically translate English into American Sign Language. "People who were born deaf use American Sign Language rather than English as their preferred language," she tells WTTW's "Chicago Tonight."

June 19, 2017
Business News Journal

Uber's CEO is taking a leave of absence amid allegations of harassment and "bro culture" at the company, reports Business News Network. "Leaders have the responsibility to set the tone from the top," says human resources management expert Jaclyn Jensen. She adds that to change company culture, leaders must "talk about values that emphasize civility and respect."

June 16, 2017
WBEZ

American citizens hoping to travel to Cuba will again have a tougher time under President Donald Trump's reversal of U.S. policy, according to law professor Alberto Coll. "Under the new regulations ... Americans who go to Cuba for so called people-to-people contacts or cultural purposes will have to be part of a larger group licensed by the U.S. government specifically for that trip," he tells WBEZ's "Worldview."

June 12, 2017
WBEZ

"We study dying so we know how to live," medical anthropologist Craig Klugman tells WBEZ's "Morning Shift." Many people avoid talking about death with family and friends, but that doesn't help, says Klugman. "There are a number of studies out that say that if you can talk about your death and dying, you are more likely to have your wishes fulfilled at the end of life, you are more likely to get the treatments you want and to not get the treatment that you do not want," he explains. 

June 08, 2017
Crain's Chicago Business

A longtime Chicago late-night theatre experience, "Too Much Light Makes the Baby Go Blind," has come to an end. Now the Neo-Futurists troupe is regrouping with a new show, but will it work? "A lot of 'Too Much Light' was less about the content -- which, sure, it's smart and funny and often very good -- but it was about the experience of doing this cool, edgy, out-of-the-box thing," says Coya Paz Brownrigg, chair of theatre studies. "It remains to be seen whether people will still feel cool going to the new show," she tells Crain's Chicago Business.

June 07, 2017
WBEZ

Rather than focusing solely on law or policy, DePaul's Refugee and Forced Migration Studies master's degree program "trains students to go out into the field and work with refugees," explains director Shailja Sharma on WBEZ's "Morning Shift." Joining Sharma was one of the program's recent graduates, Addisalem Agegnehu, who discusses what comes after earning her degree. "I really want to work abroad in refugee camps," Agegnehu says. 

June 07, 2017
Crain's Chicago Business

"The new home of DePaul basketball next to McCormick Place is almost ready for its debut," reports Crain's Chicago Business. The Wintrust Arena in Chicago's South Loop neighborhood is slated to open this fall and will also host some 50 events a year, including concerts and exhibition sports. Chicago Tribune and WGN have more. 

June 05, 2017
WTTW

In Chicago's Ravenswood neighborhood, a six-pack of microbreweries (and one distillery) attracts locals and visitors alike. "It's really a perfect storm of things happening over the last 10-15 years," says advertising expert Dan Azzaro. The cluster of businesses dubbed "Malt Row" is "building around the cool feel of the neighborhood," he tells WTTW's "Chicago Tonight."

June 04, 2017
Chicago Sun-Times

The Chicago Housing Authority's plan to move residents out of housing projects may have unintentionally lowered the city's black population, according to race and housing expert William Sampson. "The only way CHA could track these people was if they were eligible for relocation. If they relocated on their own, CHA couldn't find them. This is thousands and thousands of people," he tells the Chicago Sun-Times.

June 03, 2017
Crain's Chicago Business

Impending changes to federal healthcare law will add even more financial pressure to health systems, Wendy Nutter Epstein, faculty director of DePaul's Jaharis Health Law Institute, tells Crain's Chicago Business. "I think the uncertainty alone of what the laws are going to look like in a week, a month, a year down the road is making it very difficult for hospitals to make decisions and adapt," she says.