Campus Events

A calendar of upcoming events at DePaul

Sunday, January 28, 2018
Jeremy Ruthrauff is a saxophonist, composer/improviser and teacher based in the Chicago area active in the concert, jazz and experimental music arenas. Freelance work involves regular performances with numerous prominent ensembles such as the Chicago Symphony Orchestra (including regular concerts at Symphony Center, the MusicNow contemporary music series, and performances at the summer Ravinia festival), Lyric Opera of Chicago, Chicago's Grant Park Symphony Orchestra, Chicago Opera Theater, the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra, Chicago Contemporary Chamber Players (Contempo), Eighth Blackbird, Fulcrum Point New Music Project and the Chicago Saxophone Quartet. He has given solo and chamber music performances at prestigious venues throughout the United States and in Europe such as Merkin Hall in New York City, the Teatro Rossini in Pesaro, Italy, the Ojai Music Festival (guest artist with the Grammy award-winning ensemble Eighth Blackbird), Chicago's Museum of Contemporary Art, Harris Theater for Music and Dance in Chicago, Chicago's Steppenwolf Theatre, and the Renaissance Society. He was recently featured as a soloist on the Chicago Symphony Orchestra's contemporary music concert series MusicNow performing Jason Eckardt's work Tangled Loops for soprano saxophone and piano. Jeremy has premiered numerous new works by leading composers, including recently the world premiere of Jacob TV's multimedia opera The News with Fulcrum Point New Music Project as part of the Off the Wall concert series at the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh. He has been invited to give master classes at leading institutions such as the New England Conservatory of Music, American Composers' Forum, University of Illinois, and others. Recently, he participated in the Chicago Symphony Orchestra's program Harmonia at the National Museum of Mexican Art in which soloists introduced music to children from Chicago's Pilsen and Little Village neighborhoods.
Thursday, February 1, 2018
This workshop examines the ways in which inclusive language and practices can help foster student success. Because DePaul boasts such a diverse student population, faculty must think about a wide-range of assumptions they make about their students and the different resources students may or may not have or be aware of. Perhaps the most important meeting point between instructor and student expectations is the syllabus, and we'll begin by thinking about the syllabus as a metonym for a course itself. In this workshop, participants will articulate and evaluate assumptions about their students that their courses may make, and identify aspects of course design that can benefit from inclusive language and strategies. Through guided discussion of syllabi and examination of case studies, the workshop will help instructors think through different creative and compassionate ways in which they can be an advocate for their students' best interests while also preserving the rigorous intellectual and academic demands of their courses. We hope that faculty can test out ideas and ask difficult questions that won't produce immediate pre-formed answers. Rather, this workshop aspires to sustain existing conversations across the DePaul community, while at the same time providing practical results for faculty to incorporate into their pedagogy. *Note: We ask participants to bring two copies of a recent syllabus and course policies to the workshop. By the end of the session, participants will: Be able to articulate the active-mindset needed to adopt inclusive language and practices in their syllabi in order to build a stronger classroom community Be able to identify and evaluate assumptions they make about the students in their courses through peer discussion and analysis of syllabi Develop a revised set of course policies that incorporate the language and ideas of inclusivity and equity Use model case studies to show the ways in which resource-specific strategies will help them be an advocate for a diverse community of students at DePaul Presented by: Jeffrey Kessler (College of Liberal Arts and Sciences) Co-presenter Joyce Bean (WRD/Liberal Arts)
Thursday, February 1, 2018
PROGRAM A work by Daniel O'Hearn, to be announced Phillip Rapa Historia *world premiere performance Anton Webern (1883-1945) Symphony, Op. 21 Lu Wang (b.1976) Siren Song Ricardo Zohn-Muldoon (b.1962) Suite from Comala
Friday, February 2, 2018
This workshop examines the ways in which inclusive language and practices can help foster student success. Because DePaul boasts such a diverse student population, faculty must think about a wide-range of assumptions they make about their students and the different resources students may or may not have or be aware of. Perhaps the most important meeting point between instructor and student expectations is the syllabus, and we'll begin by thinking about the syllabus as a metonym for a course itself. In this workshop, participants will articulate and evaluate assumptions about their students that their courses may make, and identify aspects of course design that can benefit from inclusive language and strategies. Through guided discussion of syllabi and examination of case studies, the workshop will help instructors think through different creative and compassionate ways in which they can be an advocate for their students' best interests while also preserving the rigorous intellectual and academic demands of their courses. We hope that faculty can test out ideas and ask difficult questions that won't produce immediate pre-formed answers. Rather, this workshop aspires to sustain existing conversations across the DePaul community, while at the same time providing practical results for faculty to incorporate into their pedagogy. *Note: We ask participants to bring two copies of a recent syllabus and course policies to the workshop. By the end of the session, participants will: Be able to articulate the active-mindset needed to adopt inclusive language and practices in their syllabi in order to build a stronger classroom community Be able to Identify and evaluate assumptions they make about the students in their courses through peer discussion and analysis of syllabi Develop a revised set of course policies that incorporate the language and ideas of inclusivity and equity Use model case studies to show the ways in which resource-specific strategies will help them be an advocate for a diverse community of students at DePaul Presented by: Jeffrey Kessler (College of Liberal Arts and Sciences- English) Co-presenter: Joyce Bean (WRD/Liberal Arts)
Friday, February 2, 2018
Michael Kozakis, director The Percussion Ensemble consists of 15-18 percussion majors who perform a large variety of music expressly written for percussion. The ensemble is dedicated to performing a balance of historically important works and the latest contemporary works. The ensemble performs a fall, winter, and spring concert as well as performances at student recitals and clinics, including the 2003 Yamaha Orchestral Percussion Seminar. Performances include a mix of works written for the small chamber group to the large percussion orchestra. The ensemble has had the opportunity to perform with a number of guests artists including Brett Dietz, Eric Millstein and Michael Burritt.​​​