• David Lay Williams
    April 28, 2016

    "The General Will: The Evolution of a Concept" collects a set of essays that track the evolving history of the general will from its origins to recent times, and discusses the general will's theological, political, formal, and substantive dimensions with a careful eye toward the concept's virtues and limitations as understood by its expositors and critics.

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  • Rachel Marciano
    March 30, 2016

    Interested to learn the role spirituality plays in human development? Maybe you want to read a reconstruction of the lost work of a Colombian-American playwright? Perhaps you want to delve into the ethical controversies faced in today's digital culture. Browse this month's Signed by the Author columns to discover the topics our faculty and staff are exploring.

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  • Paul Booth
    March 30, 2016

    "Controversies in Digital Ethics" explores ethical frameworks within digital culture. Through a combination of theoretical examination and specific case studies, the essays in this volume provide a vigorous examination of ethics in a highly individualistic and mediated world.

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  • Rachel Marciano
    February 17, 2016

    Interested in philosopher Martin Heidegger's reflections about "being?" Looking for a comprehensive guide on the ethics of mental health? Maybe you want to learn about the newest developments regarding eulerian numbers? Check out this month's Signed by the Author columns to discover the topics our faculty and staff are writing about.

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  • Kyle Petersen
    February 17, 2016

    The Eulerian numbers form a triangular array with many of the same properties as Pascal's famous triangle of numbers. This book attempts to capture relatively recent developments and introduce readers to modern enumerative and geometric combinatorics.

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  • William McNeill
    February 17, 2016

    Translated by DePaul's William McNeill, "The History of Beyng" belongs to a series of German philosopher Martin Heidegger's reflections from the 1930s that concern how to think about being as an event.

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